When it comes to home security, the internet has a plethora of quick tips or strategies of ways to improve your home security. Being a big believer in making every little bit count, I went to Metalex President, Tom Reimer to ask him for his advice on what the best and most effective of these strategies might be. Tom was passionate about this conversation and wanted to take it one step beyond, take a few minutes to sit down with me and give me his expert take on the subject. Here is his professional take on some of these methods, a few security myths and what elements might paint a target on your house:

 

Q: What are some easy and basic tips that you would recommend so that people can further their home security?

 

A: A number of things can help. Making sure hedges and other obscuring plants are trimmed, leaving lights or a TV on while not home can be a good deterrent, “beware of dog” or other security based signs can make an intruder think twice. All of these methods are half measures though and the best way to protect your home is by enforcing all possible entry points and making sure that a thief can’t gain entry in the first place.

 

Security is about restricting access within vulnerable areas. Our goal is to provide window guards that fill a large accessible space with grids small enough to restrict entry. Any door or window that is on ground level is vulnerable and should be covered. Most important is the front door, which is currently the most vulnerable.

 

Q: Are there any security myths or mistakes that might be common that you think are important to point out or debunk? 

 

A: The myth that I hear quite often is as follows:

If they want in they will get in. Wrong. If you make it difficult they will move on.

If I put bars on my windows a thief will think I have something of value and I will become a target. Wrong. As with the above, if you make it difficult they will move on.

I don’t want my house to look like a prison; our security solutions are extremely discreet and blend in with the surroundings to the point that your neighbors wouldn’t have a clue. Only you and the burglar know for sure.

 

Q: Do you consider the techniques mentioned about more or less effective than an alarm system?

 

A: A proactive approach is always the most ideal. Our products are without a doubt more effective for the fact that they keep out the thief, unlike an alarm that only tell you of a break-in. Our products also provide carefree ventilation and peace of mind.

 

Q: What are the main features that attract a burglar to a home?

 

A: Good neighborhoods that are well maintained property, nice cars, two income family. All these things spell money, jewelry, identification, etc. That is a hot target.

 

Q: Do you have any security advice for people who may either be renting out part of their homes or renting an apartment?

 

A: No problem with renters. Often, they would be a benefit for the sake that the chance that someone is home is greater.

 

 

Jesse Saunders